“I cared for a 6-year-old boy and his 3-year-old sister. Their parents and grandmother had died from Ebola. A midwife in their village then took care of the children, but they began to show symptoms of Ebola and were sent to us. Sadly, they came too late. When the boy died, we tried to console and calm his sister, but the PPE made it difficult to touch her, to hold her, even to speak with her. She died the next day. The midwife who had taken care of them also ended up at our center, and she, too, died. Another patient told me he doesn’t remember how many members of his family have died — he thinks about 13. All he knows is that he is now alone.”
Oh Blerg! It’s Monday. Hope you’re a little bit happier than this ring-tailed cat. While you’re waking up, enjoy some facts about this elusive mammal of the American southwest.
Ringtails are nocturnal carnivores and are technically members of the raccoon family — not cats. 
The claws of these animals are semi-retractable.
They’re excellent climbers — able to maneuver among cliffs and ledges by bouncing between walls. The animals also “chimney stem,” (press all four feet on one wall and the back against the other) to climb small crevices.
Females choose a den in a rock crevice, boulder pile, or tree hollow to give birth. They nurse the young for 10-12 weeks and eventually allow them to come along and forage for food. 
Life expectancy of ringtails is about 7 years in the wild. A female kept in captivity reached the age of 16.
When threatened, the animal will arch its tail over its head and can emit a foul-smelling odor from the anal glands.
(Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons / Source: University of Michigan Museum of Zoology)
ZoomInfo
Oh Blerg! It’s Monday. Hope you’re a little bit happier than this ring-tailed cat. While you’re waking up, enjoy some facts about this elusive mammal of the American southwest.
Ringtails are nocturnal carnivores and are technically members of the raccoon family — not cats. 
The claws of these animals are semi-retractable.
They’re excellent climbers — able to maneuver among cliffs and ledges by bouncing between walls. The animals also “chimney stem,” (press all four feet on one wall and the back against the other) to climb small crevices.
Females choose a den in a rock crevice, boulder pile, or tree hollow to give birth. They nurse the young for 10-12 weeks and eventually allow them to come along and forage for food. 
Life expectancy of ringtails is about 7 years in the wild. A female kept in captivity reached the age of 16.
When threatened, the animal will arch its tail over its head and can emit a foul-smelling odor from the anal glands.
(Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons / Source: University of Michigan Museum of Zoology)
ZoomInfo

Oh Blerg! It’s Monday. Hope you’re a little bit happier than this ring-tailed cat. While you’re waking up, enjoy some facts about this elusive mammal of the American southwest.

  • Ringtails are nocturnal carnivores and are technically members of the raccoon family — not cats. 
  • The claws of these animals are semi-retractable.
  • They’re excellent climbers — able to maneuver among cliffs and ledges by bouncing between walls. The animals also “chimney stem,” (press all four feet on one wall and the back against the other) to climb small crevices.
  • Females choose a den in a rock crevice, boulder pile, or tree hollow to give birth. They nurse the young for 10-12 weeks and eventually allow them to come along and forage for food. 
  • Life expectancy of ringtails is about 7 years in the wild. A female kept in captivity reached the age of 16.
  • When threatened, the animal will arch its tail over its head and can emit a foul-smelling odor from the anal glands.

(Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons / Source: University of Michigan Museum of Zoology)

Host of Public Radio’s “Science Friday” Settles Allegations of Federal Grant Misuse

image

Ira Flatow, public radio host of the popular Science Friday program, and his for-profit corporation, will pay $145,531 to resolve allegations his company misused grant money from the National Science Foundation.

The settlement stems from a 2009 National Science Foundation award of nearly $1 million to Flatow’s privately-owned company, ScienceFriday, Inc., for the purposes of “extending the impact of its weekly radio program to a new and younger audience through the use of cyber-space platforms and interactive tools such as Facebook and Twitter.”

Read More

Happy Wednesday! Here are some fast facts about the majestic sperm whale.
They have the largest brain of any creature known to have lived on Earth.
Their heads hold a complex of organs filled with a liquid mixture of fats and waxes called spermaceti. These organs are used to generate clicking sounds used for echolocation and may also help adjust the whale’s buoyancy. 
Sperm whales are known to dive as deep as 3,300 feet in search of a meal. They feed on both giant and colossal squid.
Not much is known about their sleeping patterns, but a 2008 study in Current Biology suggested the whales may fall into deep sleep while drifting vertically.

Happy Wednesday! Here are some fast facts about the majestic sperm whale.

  • They have the largest brain of any creature known to have lived on Earth.
  • Their heads hold a complex of organs filled with a liquid mixture of fats and waxes called spermaceti. These organs are used to generate clicking sounds used for echolocation and may also help adjust the whale’s buoyancy. 
  • Sperm whales are known to dive as deep as 3,300 feet in search of a meal. They feed on both giant and colossal squid.
  • Not much is known about their sleeping patterns, but a 2008 study in Current Biology suggested the whales may fall into deep sleep while drifting vertically.