Happy Thursday! Since the past few days have been filled with sweltering heat, enjoy some facts about one of my favorite Antarctic critters, the King penguin:
They have been known to dive to a maximum of 322 meters (1056 ft.).
King penguins are the second largest of all penguin species.
Their bill has a stripe on the lower mandible that can vary in color from pinkish-red to orange. Scientists aren’t sure of its function, but think it might signal sexual maturity or social standing.
The animals don’t reach full adult coloration until three years of age.
While they prefer to live on islands surrounding Antarctica, some wandering penguins have been found as far north as Brazil and South Africa.
Penguin colonies can approach 40,000 breeding pairs.
Source: University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

Happy Thursday! Since the past few days have been filled with sweltering heat, enjoy some facts about one of my favorite Antarctic critters, the King penguin:

  1. They have been known to dive to a maximum of 322 meters (1056 ft.).
  2. King penguins are the second largest of all penguin species.
  3. Their bill has a stripe on the lower mandible that can vary in color from pinkish-red to orange. Scientists aren’t sure of its function, but think it might signal sexual maturity or social standing.
  4. The animals don’t reach full adult coloration until three years of age.
  5. While they prefer to live on islands surrounding Antarctica, some wandering penguins have been found as far north as Brazil and South Africa.
  6. Penguin colonies can approach 40,000 breeding pairs.

Source: University of Michigan Museum of Zoology

A Stud Bull & Our 100th Post!

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The Beaker has been around for a few months now and I’d like to thank you for making it part of your daily reading. Here’s a look back at some popular stories from the past few months, including a stud bull I discussed today on WNPR’s Where We Live:

Above, astronaut Alexander Gerst’s picture of Supertyphoon Neoguri. The photograph, taken on July 7, from the International Space Station, was posted to Flickr with the caption, “Watch out Japan!”
And in case you’re wondering what makes a typhoon “super,” NOAA says that’s a title conferred upon storms that reach maximum sustained 1-minute surface winds of at least 65 m/s (130 kt, 150 mph). The equivalent of a category 4 or category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic basin.

Above, astronaut Alexander Gerst’s picture of Supertyphoon Neoguri. The photograph, taken on July 7, from the International Space Station, was posted to Flickr with the caption, “Watch out Japan!”

And in case you’re wondering what makes a typhoon “super,” NOAA says that’s a title conferred upon storms that reach maximum sustained 1-minute surface winds of at least 65 m/s (130 kt, 150 mph). The equivalent of a category 4 or category 5 hurricane in the Atlantic basin.